ofsparrows:

I like to think that Howl and Calcifer just sat down and had tea and a chat once in a while. You would too if your fireplace were a sentient fire demon. It’s one of the perks.
(Super late submission to ghibli jam, which I only found out about at 10PM last night (!) Process on twitter.)

ofsparrows:

I like to think that Howl and Calcifer just sat down and had tea and a chat once in a while. You would too if your fireplace were a sentient fire demon. It’s one of the perks.

(Super late submission to ghibli jam, which I only found out about at 10PM last night (!) Process on twitter.)

artchipel:

Andres Amador (b.1971, USA)

Artist Andres Amador is a San Francisco native, world spirit. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft.
He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever. (src. Feel Design)

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Andres Amador | artist found at Feel Design]

When Stuyvesant says that women’s dress and bodies are distraction in a learning environment, for example, what they’re really saying is that they’re distracting to male students. The default student we are concerned about - the student whose learning we want to ensure is protected - is male. Never mind how “distracting” it is to be pulled from class, humiliated, and made to change outfits - publicly degrading young women is a small price to pay to make sure that a boy doesn’t have to suffer through the momentary distraction of glancing at a girl’s legs. When this dentist in Iowa can fire his assistant for turning him on - even though she’s done absolutely nothing wrong - the message again is that it’s men’s ability to work that’s important.



And when rape victims are blamed for the crime committed against them, the message is the same: This is something that happened to the perpetrator, who was driven to assault by a skirt, or a date, or the oh-so-sexy invitation of being passed out drunk. Women have infringed on their right to exist without being turned on. (Ta-Nehisi Coates describes this centering of male sexual vulnerability quite well.) Our very presence is a disruption of the male status quo.

— From my latest at The Nation, “Asking For It” 

(Source: jessicavalenti)

paintgod:

"I don’t give a damn what men find attractive. It’s unfortunate what we find pleasing to the touch and pleasing to the eye is seldom the same"
Pulp Fiction, 1994

paintgod:

"I don’t give a damn what men find attractive. It’s unfortunate what we find pleasing to the touch and pleasing to the eye is seldom the same"

Pulp Fiction, 1994

'Ayb, the word for shame in Arabic, which is closely linked to what is deemed morally wrong by society, is commonly used in everyday conversation in the Arab world. When children are told that their behavior is ayb, they learn early on that that behavior is censored by the outside world, which is not forgiving of moral violations. The anxieties around violating social norms are often less attributable to the behavior being haram¯ (a sin or religiously forbidden) as to the fear that it will lead to kalam al-nas¯ (what people will say) and therefore public reckoning. Certainly in my mind as a child, I was far more afraid of ayb’s immediate consequences of kalam al-nas¯ than of God’s wrath upon me. Asifa Siraj, in her study of Muslim gay men, finds that many men were not concerned with committing a religious sin, despite their identification with Islam; what prohibited them from coming out to their families was that they felt their parents would be concerned with what people would say and in particular what the extended family would think.

Dina Georgis; Thinking Past Pride: Queer Arab Shame in Bareed Mista3jil

(Source: isqineeha)